Tag: dinosaur

Episode 29 – First of the Four-Footed Giant Dinosaurs!

Ledumahadi and the first dinosaur giants The sauropod dinosaurs—the classic long-necks—included the largest land animal species that have ever lived. Throughout the Jurassic and Cretaceous, multiple families of sauropods achieved body masses over 50 tons: greater than any modern elephant and even exceeding the colossal indricothere rhinoceroses. Despite their incredible sizes, the sauropod dinosau …

Filed under: Africa, Giant, Jurassic, South Africa, dinosaur, prosauropod, sauropod

Episode 26 – Colobops: the tiny reptile with a big bite!

Big bites come in small skulls This episode tells a story of one of Adam Pritchard’s favorite projects from Yale University, describing the skull of a teeny reptile from the early days of the Age of Reptiles. Hailing from the eastern coast of North America (present-day Connecticut), Colobops noviportensis had a skull only an inch long. However, intensive research and three-dimensional modeling rev …

Filed under: Connecticut, Triassic, dinosaur, fossil, reptile

Episode 25 – Ceratosaurs: Story of a Predatory Dinosaur Dynasty!

Masters of horns and teeth Throughout the Jurassic and Cretaceous Periods, dinosaurs were top dogs on every continent and in every sort of environment. The ceratosaurs were some of the classic predators that ruled the tops of the food chains for much of that time. Including classic predators such as Ceratosaurus, Carnotaurus, and Majungasaurus—as well as oddballs like Masiakasaurus, Limusaurus, an …

Filed under: Carnotaurus, Ceratosaurus, Cretaceous, Dinosaurs, Jurassic, ceratosaur, dinosaur

Episode 24 – Dinosaurs and crocodiles in the Land Before Egypt!

Egyptian paleontology has a long and storied history, although much of it is focused on discoveries from the Cenozoic Era. Incredible fossils of early whales, primates, and other mammals have been discovered in Egypt since the beginning of the twentieth century, work that continues to this day. However, fossils from the Age of Reptiles are much harder to come by. Indeed, most of the fossils record …

Filed under: Africa, Cretaceous, Dinosaurs, Egypt, Paleontologists, crocodile, crocodyliform, dinosaur

Episode 22: Matheronodon, a new dinosaur with a different kind of bite!

Matheronodon is certainly a dinosaur worthy of a bigger bite. With proportionally giant teeth strikingly different from the standard-issue ornithopod dinosaur, it is certainly one of the most important dino discoveries out of Europe this year. Better yet, the original scientific paper by Pascal Godefroit and colleagues is free to read in the journal Scientific Reports! If you’d like to learn more …

Filed under: Cretaceous, Dinosaurs, Fossils, France, Ornithischia, dinosaur, feeding, jaws, ornithopod

Episode 20: Digging the Dawn of Dinosaurs – Paleontology at Ghost Ranch

Hi all. Adam Pritchard here. I’ve been thinking about telling the story of my field experience in the Triassic-aged Chinle Formation of northern New Mexico for many years. The Hayden Quarry fossil site at Ghost Ranch has produced the best-preserved and most diverse record of American dinosaurs from the Triassic of North America, plus some of the strangest reptiles that ever lived. I’ve been proud …

Filed under: Diapsids, Ecology, Fieldwork, Mesozoic, Paleontology, Triassic, dinosaur, evolution

Silhouette of Drepanosaurus, the original monkey lizard

Episode 17: Kingdom of the Monkey Lizard!

Past Time is BACK! Matt and Adam have been traveling the world independently for some time, delving deeply into the history of life on the planet, but now they’re back to tell you all about what they’ve discovered!   Painting of Drepanosaurus by paleoartist Victor Leshyk, commissioned for the publication of the New Mexico Drepanosaurus fossils In this episode, Matt interviews Adam about his r …

Filed under: Triassic, dinosaur, fossil, lizard

A Tale of Two Crocs: Predators of Cretaceous Spain

I tried to google “crocodiles are living fossils,” to see just how commonly that expression was used in popular articles. There were indeed a few articles that referenced this idea, suggesting that croc fossils from 80 million years ago would look identical the skeletons they have today. However, most were news stories reporting various discoveries in the fossil history of crocodiles and their rel …

Filed under: Cretaceous, Ecology, Europe, Spain, competition, crocodile, dinosaur, ecosystem

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